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© 2019 Sall • Myers Medical Associates. All Rights Reserved. Address: 611 River Drive, 4th floor, Elmwood Park, NJ 07407
 

How to Tell If You Have a Concussion

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Concussion?

Most people with a concussion have a good recovery from symptoms experienced at the time of the injury. But for some people, symptoms can last for days, weeks, or longer. In general, recovery may be slower among older adults, young children, and teens. Those who have had a concussion in the past are also at risk of having another one and may find that it takes longer to recover if they have another concussion.

Symptoms of concussion usually fall into four categories:

Some of these symptoms may appear right away, while others may not be noticed for days or months after the injury, or until the person starts resuming their everyday life and more demands are placed upon them. Sometimes, people do not recognize or admit that they are having problems. Others may not understand their problems and how the symptoms they are experiencing are impacting their daily activities.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

When to Seek Immediate Medical Attention: Danger Signs in Adults

In rare cases, a dangerous blood clot may form on the brain in a person with a concussion and crowd the brain against the skull. Contact your health care professional or emergency department right away if you have any of the following danger signs after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body:

  • Headache that gets worse and does not go away.

  • Weakness, numbness or decreased coordination.

  • Repeated vomiting or nausea.

  • Slurred speech.

The people checking on you should take you to an emergency department right away if you:

  • Look very drowsy or cannot be awakened.

  • Have one pupil (the black part in the middle of the eye) larger than the other.

  • Have convulsions or seizures.

  • Cannot recognize people or places.

  • Are getting more and more confused, restless, or agitated.

  • Have unusual behavior.

  • Lose consciousness (a brief loss of consciousness should be taken seriously and the person should be carefully monitored).

What Can I Do to Help Feel Better After a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

Although most people recover after a concussion, how quickly they improve depends on many factors. These factors include how severe their concussion was, their age, how healthy they were before the concussion, and how they take care of themselves after the injury.

Some people who have had a concussion find that at first it is hard to do their daily activities, their job, to get along with everyone at home, or to relax.

Rest is very important after a concussion because it helps the brain to heal. Ignoring your symptoms and trying to “tough it out” often makes symptoms worse. Be patient because healing takes time. Only when your symptoms have reduced significantly, in consultation with your health care professional, should you slowly and gradually return to your daily activities, such as work or school. If your symptoms come back or you get new symptoms as you become more active, this is a sign that you are pushing yourself too hard. Stop these activities and take more time to rest and recover. As the days go by, you can expect to gradually feel better.

Getting Better: Tips for Adults
  • Get plenty of sleep at night, and rest during the day.

  • Avoid activities that are physically demanding (e.g., heavy housecleaning, weightlifting/working-out) or require a lot of concentration (e.g., balancing your checkbook). They can make your symptoms worse and slow your recovery.

  • Avoid activities, such as contact or recreational sports, that could lead to another concussion. (It is best to avoid roller coasters or other high speed rides that can make your symptoms worse or even cause a concussion.)

  • When your health care professional says you are well enough, return to your normal activities gradually, not all at once.

  • Because your ability to react may be slower after a concussion, ask your health care professional when you can safely drive a car, ride a bike, or operate heavy equipment.

  • Talk with your health care professional about when you can return to work. Ask about how you can help your employer understand what has happened to you.

  • Consider talking with your employer about returning to work gradually and about changing your work activities or schedule until you recover (e.g., work half-days).

  • Take only those drugs that your health care professional has approved.

  • Do not drink alcoholic beverages until your health care professional says you are well enough. Alcohol and other drugs may slow your recovery and put you at risk of further injury.

  • Write down the things that may be harder than usual for you to remember.

  • If you’re easily distracted, try to do one thing at a time. For example, don’t try to watch TV while fixing dinner.

  • Consult with family members or close friends when making important decisions.

  • Do not neglect your basic needs, such as eating well and getting enough rest.

  • Avoid sustained computer use, including computer/video games early in the recovery process.

  • Some people report that flying in airplanes makes their symptoms worse shortly after a concussion.

Sall Myers Medical Associates is your one stop treatment facility and will provide for all your car accident or personal injury needs. We provide evaluations and treatments for all types of injuries throughout Northern New Jersey at our nine New Jersey offices located in Elmwood Park, NJ, Paterson NJPassaic, NJ, New Brunswick, NJ, Irvington NJ, Union City, NJ, Rochelle Park, NJ, Parsippany, NJ, and Union, NJ.

 

In some instances, same day appointments are available upon request with evaluation and treatment reports available in 48 hours or less.

If you’ve been in a car accident in New Jersey and need treatment for an auto accident or personal injury, please call us at 866-609-4448 or fill out our contact form for a consultation.

Contact us

Please call us at 866-609-4448 to schedule your consultation, or fill out our Quick Contact Form.